Every week a dragon tip! #10

Talatat blocks

Talatat blocks

Every week a dragon tip! #10

 

Chapter 13: The Temple Walls

The twins are in Luxor, Egypt, and they stand in amazement in front of the walls of the Temple of the Sun (Talatat walls), patiently rebuilt in the Museum of that town.

The fragments of the temple were used as fillers for new constructions after the death of Akhenaten “the heretic king”, and the destruction of Amarna.

Anna and Matthew have the great opportunity to join their mother’s co-workers, and to help them restoring a section of Akhenaten’s temple.

…and a mess by Matthew will prove to be an essential clue in their search of a dragon.

“The Hall of the Museum containing the Temple walls, or more accurately, the part that had been patiently rebuilt, was huge. A balustrade accessible by narrow stairs surrounded the bare room that allowed the viewer to see, in a single glance, the parallel rows of walls completely covered with drawings and hieroglyphs that partially maintained the lively original colours.

The work at the Museum consisted in putting together parts of the Temple wall, searching among the blocks piled about trying to find the right pieces to insert in the half-rebuilt artefact: a big archaeological mosaic.

«It seems like you’re doing a blind puzzle!» said Matt.

«What do you mean by a blind puzzle?» Gordon Cuthbert asked him.

«Well, it’s like you’re trying to reassemble a jigsaw puzzle without the picture on the box, and probably missing some pieces. Even more blind than this!» explained Matt, causing a burst of hilarity.”

 Luxor is a city, but it’s also an open air Museum. The Temple is known worldwide, but near this town, you can easily reach other famous archaeological sites like Karnak, the Valley of the Kings, and the incredible Hatshepsut Temple. It deserves a visit!

Talatat walls:

http://www.amarna.co.uk/talatat.php

About Akhenaten:

http://www.ancientegyptonline.co.uk/akhenaten.html

Luxor:

http://en.egypt.travel/city/index/luxor

The Temple of the Queen Hatshepsut:

https://www.bluffton.edu/~sullivanm/egypt/deirelbahri/deirelbahri.html

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